IDC: Expressions

In the IDC expressions you can use almost all C operations except:
  complex assignment operations as '+='
Constants are defined more or less like in C, with some minor differences.

There are four type conversion operations:

  long(expr)  floating point numbers are truncated during conversion
  char(expr)
  float(expr)
  __int64(expr)
However, explicit type conversions are rarely required because all type conversions are made automatically:
  - addition:
        if both operands are strings,
          string addition is performed (strings are concatenated);
        if both operands are objects,
          object combination is performed (a new object is created)
        if floating point operand exists,
          both operands are converted to floats;
        otherwise
          both operands are converted to longs;
  - subtraction/multiplication/division:
        if floating point operand exists,
          both operands are converted to floats;
        if both operands are objects and the operation is subtraction,
          object subtraction is performed (a new object is created)
        otherwise
          both operands are converted to longs;
  - comparisons (==,!=, etc):
        if both operands are strings, string comparison is performed;
        if floating point operand exists,
          both operands are converted to floats;
        otherwise
          both operands are converted to numbers;
  - all other operations:
        operand(s) are converted to longs;
If any of the long operands is 64bit, the other operand is converted to 64bit too.

There is one notable exception concerning type conversions: if one operand is a string and the other is zero (0), then a string operation is performed. Zero is converted to an empty string in this case.

The & operator is used to take a reference to a variable. References themselves can not be modified once created. Any assignment to them will modify the target variable. For example:

        auto x, r;
        r = &x;
        r = 1;   // x is equal to 1 now
References to references are immediately resolved:
        auto x, r1, r2;
        r1 = &x;
        r2 = &r1; // r2 points to x
Since all non-object arguments are passed to functions by value, references are a good way to pass arguments by reference.
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